Do Authors Have a Responsibility to Their Readers?

The life they’ve chosen

I sometimes feel sorry (just a little) for celebrities who have paparazzi in their faces whenever they go out – to a restaurant, the gym, even a supermarket. Imagine if they were going to get a bikini wax or some other personal appointment. And forget about hooking up for a kinky rendezvous. The whole world is always in their business making it difficult for them to live normal lives. If a celebrity does something stupid (who of us has never done anything stupid?) like lick a donut in a bakery and then put it back for someone else to buy (okay maybe not to that extent. That’s not only stupid, it’s disgusting and shows a lack of concern for the health and well being of others.) But when they do slip up, the whole world knows about it and often it takes a long time for the world to get over it. But as I stated, I only feel a little sorry for them, because for the most part, this is the life they’ve chosen.

The responsibility of YouTubers

My son likes watching YouTube videos, and some of the YouTubers, although entertaining, annoy me because they use foul language. I know, I know… freedom of speech and parenting your child, etc. But these video gaming entertainers know that a large part of their audience consists of young children. Therefore, they should be careful about what they do and say because impressionable children watch and imitate them. If this is what they choose to do, they have a responsibility to keep their material appropriate for the youngsters.

What about authors?

Lately I’ve been thinking about the responsibility authors – especially published authors – have to readers. They buy and read our books, and sometimes, if we’re lucky, they write reviews. Our readers are our motivation to create great stories.  When we advertise or promote an upcoming book, via interview, social media, the back content of current book or any other means, we have a responsibility to our readers to deliver what we said we would.

Cancelled

A few years ago, I read all four books in a popular series. Like many fans of the series, I was disappointed to learn that publication of the fifth book – a version of the first book told from a different point of view – had been cancelled. The author had decided not to finish it because someone had leaked part of the story. By the time I’d discovered the series, so much time had passed since the occurrence of the leak that I had hoped the author would just shake it off and finish the book. Especially since so many fans had asked, begged and pleaded for book five. I’d checked her website from time to time, looking for info, but there’d been nothing. Eventually I found a version of the story which I believe had been “completed” and posted by a fan, so I stopped checking the author’s website and moved on.

When an author chooses to introduce his or her writing to the world, be it a story, a sequel, even just an excerpt, he or she should make every effort to deliver.

 

Responsibility to my readers

Forbidden Kisses EBook.jpgOver the last few days, I’ve been reminded of my responsibility to my readers. On three occasions within as many days, someone mentioned Off Base, the sequel to my Military Romance, Forbidden Kisses.
coverThe most recent was this comment I read on my website from sjlmorgan.
The comment both made my day and broke my heart a little. Here was this reader who enjoyed book one and was ready for book two. Referring to the free sample chapter I’d included in the back of book 1, the reader was basically saying, “Why did you even include the sample chapter for book 2? Now I want it and it’s not available.” The sad thing is, I haven’t even been working on Off Base. I started it, but then out of the blue, I got an idea for a brand new story. I put Off Base on the back burner so I could work on Remember Love.

 

sjlmorgan isn’t the only reader waiting for the continuation of Layla and Ethan’s story. I went through my reviews and noted that there are at least fourteen reviews in which the reader expressed a desire to read Off Base.

  1. Can’t wait for the second installment; hoping for another winner!
  2. Can’t wait for their sequel!
  3. I’m looking forward to following this love story into their next phase of the authors “Off Base”.
  4. I’m looking forward to reading the next book in this series. 
  5. I’m interested in what happens next to Eathan and Layla in the follow up story Off Base. 
  6. I look forward to reading about the progression of their love story.
  7. Waiting for the sequel to follow these two souls in their HEA.
  8. I’m anxious for the sequel that was briefly mentioned. I fully expect wedding bells for them. I won’t accept anything less.  Love this couple to moon and back. Thank you.
  9. I can’t wait to see how the author extends the story line.
  10. I can’t wait to read your next book.
  11. Anxiously awaiting the sequel.
  12. I can’t wait for the next book.
  13. Can’t wait for Off Base!
  14. I look forward to reading Sha Renee’s next book.

Because of all these comments and the responsibility I have to my readers (and my love for Layla and Ethan’s story),  I’ve decided to hold off on Remember Love and get back to writing Off Base. Thank you, sjlmorgan for that reminder.

 

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The End of the Road

I’m sure you all can identify with this. Years ago I started something that rolled on its own beautifully and only needed an occasional push. This blog is that thing. Then the contributors started being published and happy and busy. One by one, they dropped off the list of contributors. Continue reading

Plantsing for non-gardeners by Evangeline Gold

The constant battle. Plot your story or write it by the seat of your pants?

I used to pants. If I wasn’t feeling the passion, I didn’t write. Now, I do both, and it’s saved my writing. I’m choosing to share my method and madness in case it helps others. If nothing else, you’ll have a good idea of why I’m so crazy afterward.

Get your pencil and paper ready because I’m going to drop some knowledge.Image result for drop the knowledge

Continue reading

Beta Reading versus Critiques by D.L. Hungerford

I got myself in over my head as far as time to do things. Without losing any of my regular obligations for blogs, group moderation, posts, writing, etc., I got into a beta read situation with two wonderful authors. So this blog is going to be short and sweet. Continue reading

Holy Hogmanay, Batman! by Francisco Cordoba

Zowie!

The honour of bringing the first blog post of 2017 to the Happy Authors’ Guild falls to me, and you know what? I’ve blown it.

I haven’t just forgotten to give HAG a timely hug, or omitted to whisper sweet nothings in HAG’s shell-like ear, or nipped when I should have licked between HAG’s plump and luscious thighs. No, I’ve blown it like a turkey-induced New Year’s fart that’s gonna reverberate from now until June. Continue reading

How to beat writer’s block in 5 easy steps. By Bren Kyveli

What is writer’s block?

It’s that inexplicable dead silence in your brain when you fire up the laptop to work on a novel, a chapter, a short story… a blog post. It’s that debilitating feeling of utter emptiness where a story should be. You know its there, just moments ago while driving home you had a great idea but now you’re at your laptop and it’s nothing but crickets. Right? Continue reading

What makes a writer? by May Burnett

Imagination

Inventing stories and scenes inside the mind is one of the hallmarks of the writer, a habit we share with many people who never bother to write their ephemeral creations down. However, not everyone does it. Quite a few simply cannot if they try. I have even met people who seemed unable to follow a simple “What would happen if…?” scenario, getting upset that I was wasting their time with something unreal, even though we were just chatting over lunch. Perhaps they were never told stories in their childhood, or discouraged from using their innate imagination, and I can only pity them. (It seemed more tactful to change the subject, than try to discover the origins of their inability.) Continue reading

Goal, Motivation and Conflict by Debra Dixon: (Another) Review.

 

I know, I know, this is a concept that is discussed time and time again! But the more I learn about writing, the more I understand what this simple plan can bring to a novel.

Goal, Motivation and Conflict (GMC) by Debra Dixon was the first writing craft book I bought, and now having read several other excellent books, this is still the one I repeatedly come back to. Why? Because for my easily confused, pantser brain, the message is simple.

The premise of the book is that a plot can be broken down into three parts:

A character wants a goal, because he/she is motivated but conflict stands in his/her way.

Typically, a character will have both an external and internal GMC, with the internal outlining a characters emotional arc. “If you can see it, touch it, taste it, hear it, or smell it . . . that’s external,” the book explains and uses movies, such as The Wizard of Oz, to demonstrate the idea:

External: Dorothy wants to go home, because Aunt Em is sick, but the wicked witch stands in her way.

Internal: She wants to find a place where she’s happy (think Somewhere Over The Rainbow), because she’s miserable and always in trouble, but she doesn’t know what she really wants.

As a pantser with aspirations of becoming a plotter, I’ve tried The Snowflake Method by Randy Ingermanson, The Six Stage Story Structure by Michael Hague, but my disorganised, right-brained mind, always rebels. These two GMC sentences, however, I can manage and never start a story without having them in place. It provides the essential who, what, why and why not.

“If you can trace every action in your book to a unique character’s goal and motivation, then the character will create the plot right before your eyes.”

I have found this to be true. Not only for the story as a whole, but also at scene level. When I get stuck, it’s almost always because I’ve lost sight of what one or more characters want, and why.

“Every scene should illustrate a character’s progress toward the goal, or bring the character into conflict with opposing forces, or provide the character with an experience that strengthens or changes his motivation.”

But, although at the most basic level those sentences may appear easy, they are not. It’s easy to confuse internal with external, or to discover your character goal is actually her motivation. Or the GMC may be beautifully laid out in the first chapter, but then there is no follow-through, especially if you’re writing romance like me. It’s very tempting to get distracted by the developing relationship between your characters. The romance maybe the heart of the story, but it’s not, the book stipulates, a character goal:

“The heroine’s goal in a romance novel is not to fall in love and get married. Ditto for the hero. The last thing on their minds is meeting a soul mate. In fact, it’s darned inconvenient. Romance will be a conflict for your characters.”

The book additionally covers  black moments, scene development, query letters, turning points plus a breakdown of the movies Casablanca, The Client and Ladyhawke. Also included is an example of Miss Dixon’s own query letter for her book Mountain Mystic.

Every writer has to find their own way, and different things click with different people, but this is the book that works for me. Debra Dixon is known in her own writing for pushing the boundaries of category romance, in particular with her book about a hit woman, Bad to the Bone (1996), which I recommend it to anyone wanting to write in this field.

For help outlining GMC and additional character development, the Mid-Michigan chapter of the RWA has a great chart here:

http://www.midmichiganrwa.org/gmc-charts.pdf

 

Lizzie Hermanson is a wife, mother and talented procrastinator. She writes contemporary romance when her cat isn’t hogging the keyboard and loves Happy Ever Afters. Find her @lizziehermanson

 

Balancing Characters

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I’m making soup, tonight. Pumpkin soup with some other veg, turmeric and cayenne. I’ve made this soup several times over the past two months because I like it of an evening and it’s healthy. Why am I waffling about soup? Because the other day I changed my recipe – I left out parsnip and it changed the balance of flavours in a way I didn’t like. So today I’ve added it back in, with a bit more for good measure 😀

I think writing a story is about balance. We can add too much internal thought, or too little internal thought, and the flavour of the story will change. We can add a dollop of spice, or too much spice, and the flavour will change. So the questions must be asked: What kind of story is it? And do we want the story to fit genre, or not?

We need a balance of characters to represent different aspects of the story. Maybe we have a character who always sees the humour in a situation and maybe we need a pessimist to balance out the humours. Maybe we have someone who thinks they know it all only to find out they don’t, and someone who thinks they know nothing when, in fact, they know more than they think they do.  Maybe we have a protagonist and antagonist, but do our other characters balance each other? Each character should bring a different flavour to the story, and, depending on how strong we want that flavour to be, we can enhance that quality or dilute it a little.

So, with balancing characters in mind, let’s play a game of word association. I’ll begin by putting a characteristic down, and let’s see where we go in the comments!

My word: ‘Know-it-all’

What comes into your mind? Or if you want to change characteristic, write a new one and we can all say what comes into our heads. This is a useful tool for adding depth to characters, too:)