I did it! by Cayenne Michaels

I actually did it!

And I think it’s taken me almost up to now to realize it.

A couple of weeks ago I packed up my whole house. Well, technically the brick building is still standing, but I stashed all our belongings into the spare guest room and basement. Then I jumped on a plane to move halfway across the world. To study literature. Continue reading

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Scenes: Mini Stories? by Emma Marie Leigh

I wanted to pick up with my thoughts from my last post. Basically it revolved around how I’m really good at beginnings and how I should make that work for me in a way that leads to finally typing the words THE END on a novel.

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Continue reading

Writing a Book is Easy.

Or at least it seems easy in comparison to the tasks we’re faced the-endwith once we type ‘The End’.

 

If you’re an author or have friends who are authors, you know exactly what I mean.

thOnce the story is written, everything else you need to get that baby out into the world makes the time spent on your laptop, legal pad or typewriter (remember those?) look like a cakewalk.

If you decide to publish traditionally, you’ll have to make sure your manuscript it correctly formatted down to the exact font, spacing, margins, etc. There are strict guidelines that you’ll need to adhere to. Not to mention querying publishers, waiting for replies and dealing with rejections. Continue reading

Who Am I?

The old saying, Write what you know, has thankfully been put to rest and can now be ignored. Seriously, if we only wrote what we knew, no one would have written about dragons or sand worms or vampires or werewolves. That would be a serious failing in our literary worlds. Continue reading

What I Wish I Had Known About RWA National Conventions by D.L. Hungerford

080316 con bannerI had the most amazing time. I got a room at the hotel at the last minute and a wonderful roommate to share the cost. I paid $10 in parking for the whole weekend. I saw amazing people and listened to amazing workshops and I am itching to get to work on my new business plan. Continue reading

The Great Humbling by Kate Whitaker

It takes ego to be an artist. Which is not to say that all artists are raging egomaniacs.

 

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However, it does take a certain amount of self-confidence to allow people to view your work. You have to believe that it’s good.

Do I believe in my work? Yes, yes I do. I write fun stories. They have, what I hope, is surprising depth, but they are fun, and I know I am good at what I do.

So this last week as been most humbling.

See, I stopped writing my fun shorts and novellas and dusted off my novels. 100,000+ word, door-stopping, epic fantasy… I’m BACK, baby!

 

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However, I set down these novels nearly three years ago. And I grew a lot as a writer in those years. I learned what not to do when writing. I learned  a lot of stuff I didn’t know when I wrote my novels.

Which isn’t me saying that they are terrible. They aren’t. The story is solid, the characters well-rounded, the world well-balanced.

It’s the prose. It’s the technique. It’s the little things that make me a better writer than I was three years.

And now I have to go back and fix those things. Which is very humbling. Acknowledging your faults and weaknesses as an artist is always humbling. I like that I’m a better writer than I was three years ago. But that fact that I wasn’t as good as I am now is smacking me in the face… a lot.

 

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I’m coming to understand artists who don’t review their old work.

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But I also have that ego I mentioned earlier. There is a good story here, and the work I’m doing on it is purely cosmetic. I may be better at sentence structure now, but my story structure and character development was always solid.

And I’m grateful for the other writers who took the time to help me learn the last few years. I’m going to take that knowledge and apply to these novels. I’m going to make them better because I’m a better writer.

However, being better means I wasn’t always as good as I am now… And there is the great humbling in a nut shell. If you are striving to improve, that means the stuff you did previously isn’t as good as what you do now… and I’ve gone cross-eyed.

 

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So yes, my humbling is also fueling my ego. My ego has grown because it’s been humbled. Welcome to being an artist.

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Kate Whitaker writes for fun and profit from the woods of the Olympic Penninsula. You can most likely find her sitting at her kitchen table yelling at kids as she tries to figure out a new way to kill made up monsters. She has a newsletter and a comic.

 

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Hidden treasures by Cayenne Michaels

Let’s talk about inspiration.

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Where does it come from? Is it stored inside of us and stirred awake when we encounter something in our everyday life that brings out this hidden treasure we never knew we carried?

Or, is it handed to us, as a gift, by someone or something that has you or me are the perfect person to see its true potential?

Elizabeth Gilbert says:

The universe buries strange jewels deep within us all, and then stands back to see if we can find them.

Have you found any yet? Please…share them with us in the comments field. As writers I think we all know how to appreciate them. We know how precious these discoveries are. Continue reading

Before It’s Too Late by Sha Renee

Recently when I accompanied a loved one to the hospital I noticed a man sleeping in a chair in one of the waiting areas. He appeared to be in a fairly deep sleep – arms crossed over his chest, head tilted to the side. I studied his sleeping visage for a moment. Surely he was the spouse of a dear friend I met long ago when our kids were in first grade together. But I hadn’t seen him in so long… was that actually him? If so, I should wake him up and say hello. Continue reading

The Joys of Editing by May Burnett

Lately , I find myself editing more frequently than writing new words.
To get a book ready for publication, both stages are of roughly equal importance. Some writers produce first drafts very fast and spend years on re-writes and editing, others write slowly and edit as they go. Prolific writers sometimes outsource the editing almost completely. Whatever the process, the author is ultimately responsible for putting a clean and easy read in front of the public, so outsourcing only goes so far: you still have to double-check everything yourself. Continue reading

“It’s Just Fiction” by Milo Owen

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When I was about ten or eleven years old, my grandmother came to spend a few days with us.  This was not particularly unusual – my grandparents were very close to us and lived only about forty minutes away – but usually we went to them instead of my grandmother coming to us.  I remember she knocked on my bedroom door (I was allowed to have it closed because I was “the writer”) and when she saw me, she was worried and anxious.  “What’s wrong, darling?” she asked.  “Nothing,” I answered, and then I explained, “It’s just that Charlie died.”  Charlie was the ne’er-do-well brother in Louisa May Alcott’s novel Eight Cousins.  She smiled in complete understanding, because of course it wasn’t unusual at all in my family for someone to weep over the fate of a fictional character. Continue reading