Scenes: Mini Stories? by Emma Marie Leigh

I wanted to pick up with my thoughts from my last post. Basically it revolved around how I’m really good at beginnings and how I should make that work for me in a way that leads to finally typing the words THE END on a novel.

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What I Wish I Had Known About RWA National Conventions by D.L. Hungerford

080316 con bannerI had the most amazing time. I got a room at the hotel at the last minute and a wonderful roommate to share the cost. I paid $10 in parking for the whole weekend. I saw amazing people and listened to amazing workshops and I am itching to get to work on my new business plan. Continue reading

Let’s Start At The Beginning by Emma Marie Leigh

You’ll have to forgive me. I’ve been suffering from a case of writer’s block so thick, I’ve been stumbling over what my post would be about all week. I have this awesome idea about tropes that I love, but it’ll have to be your dose on my next segment. Continue reading

The Dos and Don’ts of Opening Lines and Paragraphs by Lizzie Hermanson

This week I began re-write #476 of my opening scene – at least that’s how it feels and we’ve all been there! So I began researching what makes a good first line. How do we grab the reader so that they want to read the next page and the one after that? Continue reading

Comic Relief, or What I Learned from Shakespeare by Milo Owen

Comic relief, an amusing scene, incident, or speech introduced into serious or tragic elements, as in a play, in order to provide temporary relief from tension, or to intensify the dramatic action; relief from tension caused by the introduction or occurrence of a comic element, as by an amusing human foible. (www.dictionary.com) Continue reading

Turning Tropes on their Ears

I have never met a trope I couldn’t twist. There’s something so satisfying about playing with the expectations of readers. Tropes, like clichés, are both useful and hazardous. They are short cuts to meaning, but come with baggage. A well placed cliché paints a colorful image in just a few words. A poorly placed one elicits groans. Continue reading

Writing is Like Folding Laundry

On Scribophile’s Writers Who Love Romance group, we have developed a habit of including our daily chores along with our daily writing goals. Because Life can get in the way of writing, so it’s good to keep them under surveillance. And every day is laundry day, somewhere. Continue reading

Build Your Story by D.L. Hungerford

I’ve made the commitment to give two hours every weekday to my novel writing. Weekends are for blogs and other fun projects. I am accountable for these two hours because I go on-line to my writing communities and state that I am “sprinting,” a term we use when we sit at a keyboard and just write. Continue reading

Is Writing Easy? By Kathryn L. James

I’ve been asked, “Does writing come easy for you?” My answer is easy. Hell no.

Maybe it’s my writing style of being a panster that makes it challenging. If you aren’t familiar with the term panster, it means fly by the seat of your pants and write what comes to mind without a plan of where the story is going to go. I’ve tried to plot out an outline and it just didn’t work for me. Another habit that surely slows me down is how I write and edit at the same time. After each paragraph, I tend to stop and re-read my work. Sometimes I simply change a word or two, or I may delete the entire thing and start over. Getting a chapter just right takes takes more than several attempts before I’m satisfied. At this point I’m only in phase one of my writing process. Continue reading