I did it! by Cayenne Michaels

I actually did it!

And I think it’s taken me almost up to now to realize it.

A couple of weeks ago I packed up my whole house. Well, technically the brick building is still standing, but I stashed all our belongings into the spare guest room and basement. Then I jumped on a plane to move halfway across the world. To study literature. Continue reading

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Writing a Book is Easy.

Or at least it seems easy in comparison to the tasks we’re faced the-endwith once we type ‘The End’.

 

If you’re an author or have friends who are authors, you know exactly what I mean.

thOnce the story is written, everything else you need to get that baby out into the world makes the time spent on your laptop, legal pad or typewriter (remember those?) look like a cakewalk.

If you decide to publish traditionally, you’ll have to make sure your manuscript it correctly formatted down to the exact font, spacing, margins, etc. There are strict guidelines that you’ll need to adhere to. Not to mention querying publishers, waiting for replies and dealing with rejections. Continue reading

Hidden treasures by Cayenne Michaels

Let’s talk about inspiration.

Namibrand 1

Where does it come from? Is it stored inside of us and stirred awake when we encounter something in our everyday life that brings out this hidden treasure we never knew we carried?

Or, is it handed to us, as a gift, by someone or something that has you or me are the perfect person to see its true potential?

Elizabeth Gilbert says:

The universe buries strange jewels deep within us all, and then stands back to see if we can find them.

Have you found any yet? Please…share them with us in the comments field. As writers I think we all know how to appreciate them. We know how precious these discoveries are. Continue reading

The Sad Reality of Editing by Nikki Belaire

There’s an icon on my laptop that mocks me. Incessant in its blinking, a pencil scrolling across an open book as if the words can’t move from the head to the hand fast enough. Yet, once I stop typing, the scrolling ceases too. Even worse, when the graphic pauses, a red X covers the pencil. A damning reminder that I’m not writing. Not meeting my deadline. Not finishing my book. I hate that button. Continue reading

Voyage of the Bland

Approval
Words! How glorious they fall on the page. Fast or slow, deep or shallow, they drip from my fingers like misty drizzle or hammer from my heart in torrents. However they choose to come, I do my best to accept and relate them without prejudice.

And therein, Dear Reader, lies the rub. How I wish it were one of those warm, tingly, exciting rubs on delicate parts that leave us breathless and singing inside—but it’s not.

Continue reading

I Did it! Overcoming Step One in my Battle Against the Fear of Failure by Kate DeHart

The summer I was ten, my mom handed me a towering stack of young adult books she bought at a yard sale. Judy Blume anyone? That summer I read so many books, by the end of the stack, my parents were begging me to go outside and close the page. This started a long battle of people telling me that I was spending too much time on things that made my heart soar.

Continue reading

Writer’s resolutions 2016 by Cayenne Michaels

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

(called out in a, hopefully, cheerful voice)

I’m so not the right blogger to write the festive season post.

I’m traumatized by childhood memories of polishing silver, cleaning the porcelain and hurting my back from pulling out the couch to remove the colony of dust balls that had sought shelter there since last Christmas. They knew it was the only place in the whole house where they’d be safe from the vacuum cleaner until next year’s Christmas clean. These were just a few of the points on Mom’s endlessly long list of Things to Do and we worked our asses off up to the afternoon on Christmas Eve.

When dusk finally settled and Mom could do nothing more than fret over her mother-in-law (also called The Dragon) and stare through the foggy glass front of the stove, as if she could will the pork rib to roast to perfection, the rest of the family (except The Dragon, I suspect) would sigh in relief and silently vow to eat whatever came out of that stove, regardless how burnt or raw it was. (It took me a while, but as an adult I’ve realized the pressure of catering for a mother-in-law who’s keen to grade everybody’s effort, and why my dad would insist he’d have to make certain the aquavit (Norwegian schnapps) was still drinkable, long before the dinner guests arrived.) Continue reading

One Reason We Write — Awards by my friend Phyllis Humphrey

As I’ve done several times before, I’m devoting a blog post to winners of writing contests, this time the Anthony Awards – mysteries – from Bouchercon. Next time I’ll list winners of the Macavity Awards and Barry Awards.

Reblogged from http://phyllishumphrey.blogspot.com/2015/10/anthony-awards.html


Anthony Awards

 Bouchercon – Raleigh, North Carolina
October 8-11, 2015
Continue reading

Memory by D. L. Hungerford

I originally wrote this post for my Novel Approach blog on March 23, 2013.  The dates are off, I’m retired now and not commuting.  But the memory is still sketchy.

This week, my commute-busting audio book is “Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict” by Laurie Viera Rigler. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/548739.Confessions_of_a_Jane_Austen_Addict I found the story fun, interesting, engaging, all the good buzz words. I even enjoyed the obligatory meeting with Miss Austen that all these sorts of novel must have. Continue reading

IF WRITING WERE LIKE A REGULAR JOB by SHA RENEE

imagesPNPZ0XHK Most of us write because we love creating stories. Even if we’re not likely to earn a living from projects we’ve poured our blood sweat and tears into.  While there are countless authors who have achieved financial success from their writing many of us have accepted the fact that we can’t quit our day jobs – at least not right away. Continue reading