Stories Go Mything, Part Two

Last week, I shared my notes and ideas from a panel I sat through at ConDor Con in San Diego, CA. The panel was titled Using Mythology as a Basis for Fiction and was given by Stephen Provost. This week, I will wrap up my observations and notes. For the first part, click here. Continue reading

Stories Go Mything, Part 1 by DL Hungerford

Stephen H. Provost, who also writes as Stifyn Emrys, conducted a panel called Using Mythology as a Basis for Fiction. https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_pg_1?fst=p90x%3A1&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3Astephen+h.+provost&keywords=stephen+h.+provost&ie=UTF8&qid=1489526299 Continue reading

What’s in Your Office?

I — somewhat — recently rearranged my house. My dining room and office, to be specific. We have a very open floor plan in my house, and quite frankly, I hate it. But I love my cozy little cubby hole in the house. There’s no door, but I’m still isolated from the rest of the house without hiding in my bathroom. Continue reading

Deadlines and Real Life, by May Burnett

Do self-publishers even have deadlines? 

One would suppose that a self-published author could complete and edit her books at leisure, free from the tyranny and pressure of deadlines. That may be true for the first stumbling attempts, for the complete amateur; but the moment a writer approaches the publication of her books with any seriousness and hopes to make it her day job, deadlines are almost inevitable. Continue reading

Inside Story: The Power of the Transformational Arc by Dara Marks: A Review by Lizzie Hermanson

Last week I talked about my difficulty in coming to grips with character arcs, so this time around decided to share my thoughts on the book Inside Story: The Power of the Transformational Arc by Dara Marks, one of the top script consultants in the film industry.

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This book places the character arc at front and centre of the plot development process.It shows how to build the story from the inside out and how the inner emotional journey interrelates with both the external plot and theme. Continue reading

The Sticky Business of Character Arcs by Lizzie Hermanson

I have recently completed the first draft of a new WIP, and my fab crit partners (*waves* to The 22s) pointed out that my heroine’s character arc was off. This immediately got me racing to the cyber bookshelves in search of both information and inspiration.

Back to basics – a character arc is the journey the protagonist takes over the course of the story when he/she is forced to confront his/her emotional baggage to become a more rounded individual. As I’m writing romance, my characters have to overcome their fears in order to love. Continue reading

The Naughty Heart

Louise Redmann - Unpenned

Have you ever looked at the heart shape properly? I mean, really looked at it?

It’s naughty.

It’s sexy.

It’s romantic.

It’s everything it’s supposed to be for representing love.

Look at it this way:

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We can imagine the female anatomy – breasts leading down to the vulva – the bottom is even in a V shape, and if you turn the heart on its side, the top looks like a B!

Yet if we turn it the other way up:

– lo and behold we have a pair of testicles, and the suggestion of a man’s love member (since it’s February, I’m not going to use the word ‘penis’ because it’s not a particularly lovely word…).

So what’s the history of the heart-shape as we know it?

Some scholars argue that the shape originates from artists trying to depict the heart with three chambers, according to ancient medical texts…

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The Rational/Irrational Fear that Comes with Being a Writer by Elle W Silver

Fear is such a constant and strong emotion that we evolved a way to deal with it or keep it as far away as possible. Yet, it remains a huge part of our lives. Each one of us experiences fear in some degree and a huge percentage of us chooses to ignore it, do nothing, go on like nothing has happened.

As a writer, I have found that my greatest fear is in sharing my work. I get an idea, plan, plot and map the characters and then sit down to write the story. When I am done, or nearly done. I begin to wonder if the world is ready for the story. What will people think? Will my agent, editor or publisher send it back, telling me they can’t sell this? Or worse, will I finally hit Publish (If I am self-published) or finally get that publishing deal (If I am going traditional) only for readers to give me 1 star reviews or no reviews at all?

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Plantsing for non-gardeners by Evangeline Gold

The constant battle. Plot your story or write it by the seat of your pants?

I used to pants. If I wasn’t feeling the passion, I didn’t write. Now, I do both, and it’s saved my writing. I’m choosing to share my method and madness in case it helps others. If nothing else, you’ll have a good idea of why I’m so crazy afterward.

Get your pencil and paper ready because I’m going to drop some knowledge.Image result for drop the knowledge

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