Welcome to Anteros

If you need a quick getaway this month, why not visit Anteros? This mid-size community is the perfect destination for couples who need to reconnect, singles who haven’t lost hope, and cynical tourists who have lost their way to a Happily Ever After. Because in Anteros, we have a high rate of getting soul mates together. Continue reading

Living the Dream

Two years ago, I set out to write erotica: 10,000 words of stroke fiction. A simple enough task (I thought) as I wasn’t completely crap as a writer, and I was (if vocal evidence during the act is to be believed) pretty damn good at sex. All I had to do was write a few piddling little stories and make my mark on the world of Indie publishing. How hard could it be to write 10,000 words?

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As it turns out, pretty hard. You see, it’s not getting the wheels in motion that’s the problem. It’s finding the darn brakes. I guess they don’t grip too well when they’re sliding around in all those lovely juices. Continue reading

The internal writer paradox

For a few years, I was on a tight publishing schedule. One short or novella every month, with the occasional month off in between series.

This was a lot work. I don’t think anybody who isn’t a writer can truly understand how much work it was. I was writing stories 12 to 18 months before publishing them. Workshopping them for months, and then polishing and publishing. This includes making covers, formatting, and so, so much more.

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Then I stopped. I wanted to get back to my novels. I wanted less deadlines and more creativity.

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One year later, and I have written anything over a week. But I have been writing.

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None of it is being typed, but I’m writing and rewriting scenes in my head, like constantly. On the plus side, I’m still working. On the downside, no words on paper.

Also, I keep burning dinner, because my brain is in the Haven, not in the kitchen.

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So while I know, intellectually, that I’m writing, emotionally… that number counter isn’t going up and that chapter is still in pieces. Keeping up morale for the job is hard when I don’t have tangible things to focus on, yet I don’t see the point of writing the damn chapter until I’m sure of where it’s going.

I’m getting caught in my own paradox of working, but not writing.

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That endlessly blinking cursor can be a such a burden some days. And even though I know that when I get back to work I will likely have two or three chapters properly arranged and ready to go, I’m still not writing.

And there really isn’t anything to do, except keep working that dialogue and working through the brick walls of “but character A wouldn’t do that” and “Character B wouldn’t be there.”

Maybe tomorrow I’ll have every little thing worked out and can get some words on paper.

At very least, maybe that means I won’t burn dinner.

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***

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Kate Whitaker writes for fun and profit from the woods of the Olympic Peninsula. You can most likely find her sitting at her kitchen table yelling at kids as she tries to figure out a new way to kill made up monsters. She has a newsletter and a comic, and you can follow her on twitter.

Stories Go Mything, Part Two

Last week, I shared my notes and ideas from a panel I sat through at ConDor Con in San Diego, CA. The panel was titled Using Mythology as a Basis for Fiction and was given by Stephen Provost. This week, I will wrap up my observations and notes. For the first part, click here. Continue reading

Stories Go Mything, Part 1 by DL Hungerford

Stephen H. Provost, who also writes as Stifyn Emrys, conducted a panel called Using Mythology as a Basis for Fiction. https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_pg_1?fst=p90x%3A1&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3Astephen+h.+provost&keywords=stephen+h.+provost&ie=UTF8&qid=1489526299 Continue reading

What’s in Your Office?

I — somewhat — recently rearranged my house. My dining room and office, to be specific. We have a very open floor plan in my house, and quite frankly, I hate it. But I love my cozy little cubby hole in the house. There’s no door, but I’m still isolated from the rest of the house without hiding in my bathroom. Continue reading

Deadlines and Real Life, by May Burnett

Do self-publishers even have deadlines? 

One would suppose that a self-published author could complete and edit her books at leisure, free from the tyranny and pressure of deadlines. That may be true for the first stumbling attempts, for the complete amateur; but the moment a writer approaches the publication of her books with any seriousness and hopes to make it her day job, deadlines are almost inevitable. Continue reading

Inside Story: The Power of the Transformational Arc by Dara Marks: A Review by Lizzie Hermanson

Last week I talked about my difficulty in coming to grips with character arcs, so this time around decided to share my thoughts on the book Inside Story: The Power of the Transformational Arc by Dara Marks, one of the top script consultants in the film industry.

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This book places the character arc at front and centre of the plot development process.It shows how to build the story from the inside out and how the inner emotional journey interrelates with both the external plot and theme. Continue reading

The Sticky Business of Character Arcs by Lizzie Hermanson

I have recently completed the first draft of a new WIP, and my fab crit partners (*waves* to The 22s) pointed out that my heroine’s character arc was off. This immediately got me racing to the cyber bookshelves in search of both information and inspiration.

Back to basics – a character arc is the journey the protagonist takes over the course of the story when he/she is forced to confront his/her emotional baggage to become a more rounded individual. As I’m writing romance, my characters have to overcome their fears in order to love. Continue reading

The Naughty Heart

Louise Redmann - Unpenned

Have you ever looked at the heart shape properly? I mean, really looked at it?

It’s naughty.

It’s sexy.

It’s romantic.

It’s everything it’s supposed to be for representing love.

Look at it this way:

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We can imagine the female anatomy – breasts leading down to the vulva – the bottom is even in a V shape, and if you turn the heart on its side, the top looks like a B!

Yet if we turn it the other way up:

– lo and behold we have a pair of testicles, and the suggestion of a man’s love member (since it’s February, I’m not going to use the word ‘penis’ because it’s not a particularly lovely word…).

So what’s the history of the heart-shape as we know it?

Some scholars argue that the shape originates from artists trying to depict the heart with three chambers, according to ancient medical texts…

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